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Research Papers

Recent Publications  
Abstract
The role of mindfulness in the workplace has emerged as a legitimate and growing area of organizational scholarship. The present research examined the role of employee emotional exhaustion in mediating the relationship of mindfulness with turnover intentions and task performance. Drawing on theory and empirical research on both organizational behavior and mindfulness, we predicted that more mindful employees would show lower turnover intentions and higher task performance and that these relationships would be mediated by emotional exhaustion. We tested these hypotheses in two field studies in an Indian context. Study 1 was a field study of call center employees of a multinational organization, an industry in which turnover rates are very high. This study found that mindfulness was associated with lower turnover intentions and less emotional exhaustion, and that emotional exhaustion mediated the relationship between mindfulness and turnover intentions. Study 2 replicated these results in a sample of employees based in major Indian cities and drawn from different industries. In addition, it showed that mindfulness was positively related to supervisor-rated task performance, with emotional exhaustion again playing a mediating role. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of our findings, as well as future research directions.

Paper
The mediating role of emotional exhaustion in the relationship of mindfulness with turnover intentions and job performance. Mindfulness. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-016-0648-z.

Authors
Reb, J., Narayanan, J., Chaturvedi, S, & Ekkirala, S. (2016).

Abstract
With perhaps a few exceptions per day, we are seldom fully aware of our thoughts, actions, emotions, and of what is happening around us. Even when it comes to making decisions, an activity that is often quite conscious, deliberate and intentional, people are typically not as aware as they could be. We argue that as a result, decision quality may suffer. Consequently, mindfulness, most often defined as the state of being openly attentive to and aware of what is taking place in the present, both internally and externally (e.g., Brown & Ryan, 2003; Kabat-Zinn, 1982, 1990; see also Chapter 3 of this volume), can help people make better decisions.
 

Publication
Improving decision making through mindfulness. In Reb, J., & Atkins, P. W. B. (Eds.), Mindfulness in organizations: Foundations, research, and applications (pp. 163-189). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Authors
Karelaia, N., & Reb, J. (2015).

Abstract
Hardly a day goes by without a new media report on the benefits of mindfulness. In the corporate world mindfulness training programs are becoming increasingly popular. This trend is fuelled by highly visible organizations, such as Google, Intel, or General Mills, offering mindfulness-based programs for their employees. At the same time, many leaders, HR and wellbeing professionals in organizations are probably still wondering what mindfulness is and whether mindfulness training would work in their organization. Organizational scholars, having taken note of research on mindfulness conducted mostly in medical and clinical psychology, are also wondering if mindfulness is a valid research area for the organizational sciences or some wishy-washy, esoteric, or religious topic not qualifying for serious scholarship. It is for these reasons that this edited book on mindfulness in organizations is needed. We think this book will be useful for three main audiences. First, if you are a scholar, or PhD student, interested in mindfulness, particularly in organizations you will find this volume valuable because the chapters provide the most contemporary account of empirical and theoretical research on mindfulness in organizations, as well as providing helpful suggestions for promising areas of future research. Second, and just as importantly, this volume will also help organizational practitioners and leaders who may be trying to incorporate mindfulness into their (work) lives or who may wonder whether they should make mindfulness training programs available to their employees. If this is you, you will find ideas about the design and implementation of mindfulness programs, traps to avoid and ways to make such training relevant to staff who may never have heard of mindfulness. Last but not least, we think this book will provide valuable material to those who work with mindfulness in other ways. These include mindfulness trainers offering mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in organizations, business school instructors wanting to incorporate mindfulness into their teaching, and coaches working with mindfulness for themselves or their clients. 

Publication
Mindfulness in organizations: Foundations, research, and applications. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Authors
Reb, J., & Atkins, P. W. B. (Eds.). (2015).

Link

http://www.cambridge.org/sg/academic/
subjects/management/organisation-studies/mindfulness-organizations-foundations-research-and-applications?format=PB

 

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Publication
Introduction. In Reb, J., & Atkins, P. W. B. (Eds.), Mindfulness in organizations: Foundations, research, and applications (pp. 1-16). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Authors
Reb, J., & Atkins, P. W. B. (2015).

Abstract
A recent Forbes article stated that “Mindfulness is hot right now—Hollywood hot, Davos hot, Main Street hot…For business leaders, encouraging mindfulness is more than just being tuned in; it’s a strategy to improve person and company-wide performance and productivity….” (Bruce, 2014). Leadership is a perennially trendy topic, and its fusion with mindfulness creates a combination of potential über-trendiness. But is this hype justified? Our endeavour in this chapter is to elaborate on the connections between mindfulness and leadership. A related goal is to take a critical look: generally both mindfulness and leadership are viewed in a positive light. “Leadership” evokes ideas of strengths, charisma, transformation and achievement. Yet at the same time, a “dark side” of leadership and leaders also surfaces in in the form of leader arrogance, hubris, cronyism, abusive supervision, and outright dictatorships.
 
 

Publication
Leading with mindfulness: Exploring the relation of mindfulness with leadership behaviors, styles, and development. In Reb, J., & Atkins, P. W. B. (Eds.), Mindfulness in organizations: Foundations, research, and applications (pp. 256-284). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Authors
Reb, J., Sim, S., Chintakananda, K., & Bhave, D. P. (2015).

Abstract
This chapter discusses the practice of mindfulness in organizations. In the first section we describe the growing interest in mindfulness training among organizations and discuss possible reasons for this development. We then review work on the definition and concept of mindfulness as they have been developed in psychology and organizational scholarship. In the second section, we discuss different forms of mindfulness practice in organizations, including Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) as the most prominent. The third section reviews empirical evidence on the effects of mindfulness on work-related outcomes and processes such as employee performance, employee well-being, leadership, and ethical decision making. We then discuss in more detail a recently developed self-administered mindfulness training program as it contains some unique and interesting features relevant to mindfulness intervention studies. In the fifth section, we present the results from qualitative interviews we conducted with participants of a corporate mindfulness training program. We conclude that the study and application of mindfulness in the workplace offers many promising directions; however, much more research is needed to create a basis of evidence for successful mindfulness training programs. Furthermore, a deeper understanding of the (intended and unintended) consequences, mediating mechanisms, moderating factors, and boundary conditions of mindfulness would benefit organizational scholarship.
 

Publication
Mindfulness in organizations. In Singh, N. (Ed.). The psychology of meditation. Nova. 

Authors
Reb, J., & Choi, E. (2014). 

Abstract
The present study examines antecedents and consequences of two aspects of mindfulness in awork setting: employee awareness and employee absent-mindedness. Using two samples, thestudy found these two aspects of mindfulness to be beneficially associated with employeewell-being, as measured by emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and psychological needsatisfaction, and with job performance, as measured by task performance, organizationalcitizenship behaviors, and deviance. These results suggest a potentially important role ofmindfulness at the workplace. The study also found that organizational constraints andorganizational support predicted employee mindfulness, pointing to the important role thatthe organizational environment may play in facilitating or hindering mindfulness at theworkplace. The results further suggest that employee awareness and absent-mindedness aredifferent constructs that have distinct nomological networks. Implications and futuredirections are discussed.Keywords: Absent-mindedness; Awareness; Mindfulness; Performance; Well-being

Papers
Leading mindfully: Two studies on the influence of supervisor trait mindfulness on employee well-being and performance. Mindfulness, 5(1), 36-45. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-012-0144-z.

Authors
Reb, J., Narayanan, J., & Chaturvedi, S. (2014).

Link
http://ink.library.smu.edu.sg/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4319&context=lkcsb_research

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Publication
In search of ‘Asian’ conceptions of leadership with a focus on mindfulness. In Menkhoff, T., Chay, Y. W., Evers, H., & Hoon, C. Y. (Eds.), Catalysts of change: Chinese business in Asia. World Scientific Publishing.

Authors
Chay, Y. W., Chow, C., Evers, H., Lee, C. L., Menkhoff, T., Reb, J., & Tan, J. (2013). 

Abstract
The present study examines antecedents and consequences of two aspects of mindfulness in awork setting: employee awareness and employee absent-mindedness. Using two samples, thestudy found these two aspects of mindfulness to be beneficially associated with employeewell-being, as measured by emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and psychological needsatisfaction, and with job performance, as measured by task performance, organizationalcitizenship behaviors, and deviance. These results suggest a potentially important role ofmindfulness at the workplace. The study also found that organizational constraints andorganizational support predicted employee mindfulness, pointing to the important role thatthe organizational environment may play in facilitating or hindering mindfulness at theworkplace. The results further suggest that employee awareness and absent-mindedness aredifferent constructs that have distinct nomological networks. Implications and futuredirections are discussed.
Keywords: Absent-mindedness; Awareness; Mindfulness; Performance; Well-being

Papers
Mindfulness at work: Antecedents and consequences of employee awareness and absent-mindedness. Mindfulness. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-013-0236-4.

Authors
Reb, J., Narayanan, J., & Ho, Z. W. (2013).

Link
http://ink.library.smu.edu.sg/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4539&context=lkcsb_research

Abstract
We examined the effect of mindful attention on negotiation outcomes in distributive negotiationsacross four experiments. In Studies 1 and 2, participants who performed a short mindful attentionexercise prior to the negotiation claimed a larger share of the bargaining zone than the controlcondition participants they negotiated with. Study 3 replicated this finding using a differentmanipulation of mindful attention. Study 4 again replicated this result and also found thatmindful negotiators were more satisfied with both the outcome and the process of the negotiation.We discuss theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and future directions.Keywords: Distributive Negotiation; Mindful Attention; Mindfulness; Negotiation; NegotiationPerformance; Negotiation Satisfaction; Value Claiming

Papers
The influence of mindful attention on value claiming in distributive negotiations: Evidence from four laboratory experiments. Mindfulness. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-013-0232-8.

Authors
Reb, J., & Narayanan, J. (2013).

Link
http://ink.library.smu.edu.sg/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4540&context=lkcsb_research

 

Cases Author
A mindfulness training program at If Insurance. Teaching case. Singapore Management University. SMU Case ID: SMU-12-0017. Reb, J. (2012).
A mindfulness training program at If Insurance. Teaching note. Singapore Management University. SMU Case ID: SMU-12-0017TN Reb, J. (2012).

 

Last updated on 09 Nov 2017 .