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OM Graduate Courses

 

EXECUTIVE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MGMT619 Managing Innovation and Growth

Necessity is the mother of invention. One reason for firms to innovate is the necessity to re-invent themselves and get out of stagnation: the industry has either gotten obsolete, or competitors have adopted newer and more efficient business models, and products or services based on more advanced technologies. Innovation is then a necessity as the firm has to innovate or perish, one only has to look at what happened to Blockbuster and Kodak. Blockbuster at one point of time was the leading media rental firm in the world, but they chose to ignore innovation in the way they were delivering their media content to customers. As Netflix gained scale, Blockbuster’s inability to innovate meant that their business model was obsolete, and they had no choice but to file for bankruptcy. Kodak is another famous example: Steven Sasson at Kodak invented the digital camera way back in the 1970s, but rather than developing and commercializing the innovation, Kodak chose to put the new technology on the backburner, as its commercialization would have meant that their existing business model that relied on chemical printing of photographs would have to be cannibalized. However, other competitors jumped on the bandwagon for competitive advantage: hence, if you do not pursue innovation, your competitors will make you obsolete someday, no product or business model has an eternal shelf life. Innovation has many dimensions: it creates value for existing customers, thereby letting you keep your current market share; it creates value for new customers, enabling you to get growth; it enables you to work with new processes to access a lower cost base; supplier innovation enables you to leverage partners’ innovation capabilities to offer value to customers, and capture value for yourself. So the notion of continuous improvement is indeed extendable to continuous innovation, the business world in all sectors moves on a treadmill; the pace of the treadmill is faster in some industries like technology and fashion, and slower in some other industries. Innovation is the lever that enables you to keep pace on the treadmill if you are at the industry average; and enables you to set the pace if you innovate at a faster rate than the industry average. If you stand still on the treadmill or run at a slower pace than the treadmill in a competitive environment, at some stage, you will be thrown off the treadmill.

This course should be of particular interest to people aspiring for a career in designing and managing for innovation, either directly (e.g., V.P. of R&D, R&D Manager) or indirectly (e.g., management consulting). The course will also be useful to SME proprietors and entrepreneurs who intend to serve new markets, or use new technologies, or participants who wish to strategically reposition their offerings in an existing market. The course should also be of interest to people who manage interfaces between innovation and business functions such as finance, marketing, managerial accounting and human resources.

 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MGMT611 Operations Management

When companies produce and deliver goods or services to meet customer demand, they do so by managing operations, in other words by executing business processes.  In this course, students discover how business processes can be designed, analyzed and improved to lift the performance of any organization, whether it is a bank, a hospital, a resort, or a fashion retailer.  The course reveals how process management skills can be used to reduce costs, lower inventories, cut waiting times, improve quality, enhance service levels, and increase revenues and company profits.  Specifically, students will gain practical knowledge of process design, demand forecasting, capacity planning, workflow planning and control, quality management, and lean operations. With a focus on the basic concepts that govern process management, the course also provides the necessary foundation to pursue further development in operations and supply chain management.

 

OPIM623 Technology Enabled Business

Businesses are moving away from brick and mortar to create new business models that are heavily reliant on technology. This technology enablement is leading to a host of business models that require or can benefit from new functional expertise and processes. It is the aim of this course to provide students with the necessary skills to evaluate the changing business world, and identify opportunities to harness and optimize technology-enabled businesses.

The course would cover aspects relating to business models, supply chain strategies, fulfilment technology and innovations, technology leverage for management, and consumer insights.  Specifically, the course consists of two parts: (i) business strategies and operational challenges for technology enabled business and (ii) disruptive innovations and the applications of business analytics. The course will be an eight-week elective with each part covered over four weeks. 

 

OPIM624 Decision Analysis

The objective of this course is to introduce Management Science, which is the application of the scientific method to managerial and personal decision-making.  The management science approach consists of defining a problem, developing a model, acquiring data, developing a solution, testing the solution, analyzing results and implementing results.  The course will first introduce briefly ‘problem structuring’ to understand the problem situation. Modeling the problem situation will then be taken up. Decision models can be categorized as Prescriptive, Predictive and Descriptive. This course will discuss some Prescriptive and Descriptive models. The course complements the pre-study course “Quantitative Methods” which mainly focuses on Predictive and Descriptive modeling. To be specific, this course will introduce quantitative modeling tools such as linear programming, integer programming, network modeling and simulation.

 

OPIM626 Risk Management in Global Supply Chains

A supply chain comprises firms, organizations, and individuals, linked through physical (material), information and financial flows, and whose activities enable products and services to be created and reach the consumers. In the last few decades, supply chain managers have reoriented their focus beyond the traditional logistics issues towards the development of integrated risk management approaches to handle the multiplicity and magnitude of risk factors in global supply chains. These risk factors include disruptions arising from natural and man-made disasters, fast-changing customer preferences, tight financial credit environments and fluctuating exchange rates and commodity prices. Building a functional supply chain requires careful planning and consideration of a variety of risks, and it is of paramount importance to integrate management of physical flows, information and financial flows in dealing with such risks. All logistics and supply chain organizations that effectively manage their supply chain risks enjoy a level of robustness and resilience that leads to unprecedented levels of operational excellence with all consequential advantages. The objective of this course is to outline a portfolio of proven strategies to access, reduce, hedge, and mitigate supply chain risks.  

 

IE-SMU MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MGMT619 Managing Innovation and Growth

Necessity is the mother of invention. One reason for firms to innovate is the necessity to re-invent themselves and get out of stagnation: the industry has either gotten obsolete, or competitors have adopted newer and more efficient business models, and products or services based on more advanced technologies. Innovation is then a necessity as the firm has to innovate or perish, one only has to look at what happened to Blockbuster and Kodak. Blockbuster at one point of time was the leading media rental firm in the world, but they chose to ignore innovation in the way they were delivering their media content to customers. As Netflix gained scale, Blockbuster’s inability to innovate meant that their business model was obsolete, and they had no choice but to file for bankruptcy. Kodak is another famous example: Steven Sasson at Kodak invented the digital camera way back in the 1970s, but rather than developing and commercializing the innovation, Kodak chose to put the new technology on the backburner, as its commercialization would have meant that their existing business model that relied on chemical printing of photographs would have to be cannibalized. However, other competitors jumped on the bandwagon for competitive advantage: hence, if you do not pursue innovation, your competitors will make you obsolete someday, no product or business model has an eternal shelf life. Innovation has many dimensions: it creates value for existing customers, thereby letting you keep your current market share; it creates value for new customers, enabling you to get growth; it enables you to work with new processes to access a lower cost base; supplier innovation enables you to leverage partners’ innovation capabilities to offer value to customers, and capture value for yourself. So the notion of continuous improvement is indeed extendable to continuous innovation, the business world in all sectors moves on a treadmill; the pace of the treadmill is faster in some industries like technology and fashion, and slower in some other industries. Innovation is the lever that enables you to keep pace on the treadmill if you are at the industry average; and enables you to set the pace if you innovate at a faster rate than the industry average. If you stand still on the treadmill or run at a slower pace than the treadmill in a competitive environment, at some stage, you will be thrown off the treadmill.

This course should be of particular interest to people aspiring for a career in designing and managing for innovation, either directly (e.g., V.P. of R&D, R&D Manager) or indirectly (e.g., management consulting). The course will also be useful to SME proprietors and entrepreneurs who intend to serve new markets, or use new technologies, or participants who wish to strategically reposition their offerings in an existing market. The course should also be of interest to people who manage interfaces between innovation and business functions such as finance, marketing, managerial accounting and human resources.

 

MGMT685 Team Projects

The Team Projects course provides MBA students the opportunity to engage in self-directed learning in a real-world business environment with the support of a faculty advisor. Students work in teams of five to seven students and are engaged to create strategic change at client organizations. The client defined projects last approximately 10 months and can range from best practice implementation, process improvement, new product/service design, expansion planning, market entry, to design and implementation of specific functional strategies (HR, marketing, operations, etc.). Teams are required to apply the principles of evidence-based management to the specified business opportunity at the client organization. A team project will involve data collection, data analysis, best-practice research, action planning, implementation and evaluation. The main objective in this course is for students to gain confidence in managing a wide range of real-world business projects by enhancing their research, analysis, thinking, planning, project management, communication, collaboration, negotiation and presentation skills in a real high-stakes setting.

 

OPIM622 Project Management

Project management is a key component of strategy implementation. Analysts are keenly aware of this and closely monitor the performance of key projects when they evaluate companies. Also, in the knowledge-based economy, projects are responsible for a large proportion of value generation and many traditional organizations are being transformed into “project-based-organizations.” As a result, general managers need to understand project management best practice, not only because they may oversee important projects but also because they need to be good ‘consumers’ of projects.
This course provides an overview of project management best practice. We will use the first three sessions of the course to summarize the “traditional” project management techniques learned over the last 30 years. We will then discuss different management approaches for different kinds of projects, with different priorities and different levels of uncertainty. Finally we will examine how companies organize projects in collaboration with suppliers.

This course is targeted at managers who need to lead or oversee important and challenging business projects. The course is not focused on technical project management, but rather on the organizational issues surrounding it. The course combines cases, exercises, simulations lectures, and discussions, using relevant observations and experiences of the students in the class.

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INNOVATION

MGMT665 Supply Chain and Partnership Management

This course introduces basic concepts that facilitate effective management of companies’ supply chains and their business partners. A key aspect of this course is to appreciate the importance of holistically managing one’s stakeholder network in support of strategic innovation management and successful commercialization. Topics include supply chain strategies, business model innovations, e-commerce fulfillment, and omni-channel distribution. The course will be taught in forms of lectures, in-depth case-study discussions, in-class simulations, and a group project. The students are expected to carefully read the assigned cases and come prepared to class.

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT

MGMT686 Digital Business

The world of commerce is going rapidly beyond brick and mortar, and is increasingly relying on digital technology. Today, customers expect a consistent buying experience across all retail channels - in store, on the web, and on mobile devices. This leads to a host of business models that require or can benefit from new functional expertise and processes. The objective of this course is to provide students with the necessary skills to evaluate the changing business world, and identify opportunities to harness and optimize businesses through digital technology. The course would focus discussion around digital business and would cover aspects relating to business strategies, digital business supply chains, fulfillment technology and innovations, technology leverage for management, and consumer insights.  Specifically, the course consists of two parts: (i) business strategies and operational challenges for digital business and (ii) disruptive innovations and the applications of business analytics to digital business. The course will be an eight-week elective with each part covered over four weeks. 

 

OPIM617 Operations and Supply Chain Management

This course presents the design of new supply chains and the restructuring of existing supply chains to be sustainable and provide better value in a global context. We will analyze the design of innovative supply chains that provide firms with a strategic and sustainable competitive advantage, that utilize global resources and markets.

This course should be of particular interest to people aspiring for a career in designing and managing business processes, either directly (e.g., V.P. of Operations, Logistics Manager) or indirectly (e.g., management consulting). The course will also be useful to entrepreneurs who intend to serve new markets, or use new technologies, or participants who wish to strategically reposition their offerings in an existing market. The course should also be of interest to people who manage interfaces between operations and other business functions such as finance, marketing, managerial accounting and human resources.

 

OPIM618 Decision Analysis

The objective of this course is to introduce Decision Analysis, which is the application of the scientific method to managerial and personal decision-making.  The decision analysis approach of analysing decisions consists of defining a problem, developing a model, acquiring data, developing a solution, testing the solution, analyzing results and implementing results.  Decision models can be categorized as Prescriptive, Predictive and Descriptive. This course will discuss some Prescriptive and Descriptive models. To be specific, this course will introduce quantitative modeling tools such as linear and integer programming, decision tree analysis and simulation.

 

PHD IN BUSINESS (OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT)

OPIM700 Linear Optimisation

The course takes a unified view of optimisation models in operations research and covers the main areas of application and the main optimisation algorithms. It includes the following topics: Linear Optimisation, Network Flows, Discrete Optimisation, Conic Optimisation and Stochastic Optimisation.

 

OPIM701 Probability and Statistics

The world is full of unpredictability. An important part of business management study is on how to make good decisions under uncertainty. Probability and statistics provide the theoretical foundation for advanced study in almost every research field in business, economics, and information systems. This course serves as a graduate-level introductory course. Topics covered in this course include combinatorial analysis, axioms of probability, conditional probability, random variable, expectation, limit theorem, simulation, descriptive statistics, sampling, confidence interval, hypothesis test, and regression.

 

OPIM702 Foundations of Operations Management

Operations Management (OM) is the design and management of the processes that transform inputs into finished goods or services. World-class performance in operations is essential for a company’s competitive success and long-term survival. This translates into a continuous search for ideas to improve a company’s operations. The objective of this course is to give doctoral students a solid foundation in the models and principles that are necessary to generate improvement ideas. This course is designed to expose doctoral students to the current and emerging research topics in operations management. In the process, we will get exposed to a few seminal articles that have been selected based on evidence of a novel approach to either domain knowledge and/or research methods.

 

OPIM703 Dynamic Programming

This course covers the theory and application of dynamic programming (DP), i.e. optimal sequential decision making in the presence of uncertainty. It is intended for students who are interested in applying dynamic programming in the research.  This course will lay the mathematical foundations for dynamic programming, introduce the theory, and explore applications drawn from inventory management, revenue management, supply chain management, commodity storage management, retail operations, etc. This course will also touch upon approximation dynamic programming techniques for large-scale problems. This course will focus on discrete time and stochastic problems.

 

OPIM704 Stochastic Models

Stochastic models deal with the modelling and analysis of the behaviour of systems that evolve randomly over time. This Ph.D.-level course will survey the important tools of stochastic processes to understand and control the behavior of systems under uncertainty. Applications to business problems related to managing inventory, waiting lines, reliability and others will be discussed.

 

OPIM705 Topics in Advanced Optimisation Techniques

The objective of this course is to introduce students to convex optimisation and some advanced optimisation problems. 

 

OPIM706 Topics in Game Theory and Its Applications

Game theory is the analysis of situations in which the payoff of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. It is a standard analytical tool in social sciences. This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of game theory and its applications in business research. It aims to deepen students’ understanding of strategic interaction between firms. Basic concepts such as dominance, Nash equilibrium, backward induction, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signalling are discussed in the course. The classic literature in business and management is used to illustrate the concepts. 

 

OPIM730 Pro-Seminar in Operations Management

The purpose of this course is to introduce area members’ main research topics and interests to the new PhD students. Each week one or two faculty members will present their research work so as to expose incoming PhD students to interesting problems in the field. It is envisaged that this course will jump start the matching process between students and PhD supervisors.

 

DOCTOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MGMT720 Supply Chain Innovation

Businesses create value by supplying their products or services to satisfy customer demand. This involves acquiring and organizing resources as well as partnering with suppliers in such a way that the targeted range of products and services are delivered to customers dependably in a costly and timely manner. A common challenge is the inflexible nature of supply and demand, which creates mismatches between the available supply and the customer demand. This leads to severe economic consequences on account of unsatisfied customers or wasted resources. To overcome this challenge and to maintain a competitive position, businesses need to constantly design and implement appropriate operational and supply chain capabilities.  In this course, we will study operations strategy, including manufacturing strategy and the resource based view of the firm, the management of global operations, the role of senior operations executives in the firm, contemporary research in operations strategy, followed by techniques that limit the incidence and consequence of supply-demand mismatches. Throughout the course, the focus will be on how to develop a competitive set of operations and supply chain capabilities. Using research articles and examples from a wide range of industries, we will illustrate that firms that employ these techniques and principles enjoy a significant competitive advantage.

 

DOCTOR OF INNOVATION

MGMT 711 Innovation Development

Part 1: This course provides an introduction to design thinking and design methods. Design techniques have become a popular means of teaching people how to innovate, and especially so for the early stages of innovation. The techniques are ideal for not only problem solving but also for problem finding. The main components are as follow:

· An introduction to the whole design thinking cycle via the Stanford “Wallet exercise” (or the design of its equivalent), which roughly follows the observation/ideate/prototype process.
· An introduction to field research techniques (primarily, interviewing and observational study).
· Ideation techniques such as brainstorming, and its comparison with a few other ideation techniques.
· Rough or low fidelity (so-called) prototyping methods using simple materials to achieve form and three-dimensionality, but without mechanical functionality.

Each session is followed by a more academic discussion that discusses topics such as the strengths and weaknesses of various techniques. Students will also be exposed to the design studies tradition.

Part 2: The second part of this course provides an overview of the innovation development process and the decisions that are made in the innovation development process. These decisions include:

· the product definition (conceptualization and specifications to be included in the product), the sharpness/fuzziness of the definition, the timing of the definition.
· the design and formation of innovation teams, building trust between the different partners, and the role of diversity, and
· the management of risk in new product development, and the study of risk management practices.

Last updated on 28 Jul 2016 .